The Wes Anderson Gift Guide

Anyone who has known me for at least one holiday season knows that there are very few things I love more in this world than giving people gifts. It combines all of my greatest skills: remembering obscure details, empathy, consumerism without having to keep the stuff I buy, and doing things for other people as a form of self-care. Most people don’t know that I also love Wes Anderson, but when I tell them that’s usually accompanied by a groan or sigh and a reaction of “oh my god, of course you love Wes Anderson.”

I was just looking at my bank account and feeling very sorry for myself with the realization that I simply couldn’t afford to go full Santa’s Workshop (or whatever the Jewish equivalent of that is) this year when Nicole Cliffe and John Leavitt began positing what you could possibly buy Wes Anderson for his birthday if he was your friend. Nicole claimed it was impossible. John claimed it was easy. It was like they put a bat signal in the sky that said “JULIA, PLEASE ABANDON ALL OF YOUR OTHER EARTHLY DUTIES AND ATTEND TO THIS WHICH WILL COST YOU EXACTLY ZERO DOLLARS.”

And, well, I did.

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The Case For Keeping Marc-Andre Fleury (Originally for Pensburgh)

It’s generally assumed by everyone who knows anything about hockey that the Pittsburgh Penguins will be trading Marc-Andre Fleury instead of protecting him and losing goaltender Matt Murray to the expansion draft. And while I agree that losing Matt Murray for nothing would be terrible, I also feel that, if I were GM Jim Rutherford, I’d trade Matt Murray over trading Marc-Andre Fleury.

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The Smartest Girl In The Room Runs for President

Because they were boring, I remember very little of high school English classes, and even less of The Great Gatsby. Most of what I remember of that book boils down to two things: The first is that Nick has a giant, poorly-repressed homosexual boner for Jay Gatsby. The second is more enduring – it’s when Daisy says about her newborn daughter; “I hope she’ll be a fool – that’s the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool.”

How true, I remember thinking to myself, and how sad that it almost a century later and that was still the best thing a girl could be. I wished, with a not-so-small but shameful part of myself, that I was also beautiful and foolish.

– – –

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Revelry At Griffin’s Wharf A Time For History To Come Alive

Note: For the first assignment for my summer Multimedia Journalism task I was tasked with writing a print story (and taking pictures) on an event. Though this happened over six weeks ago, now that the class is over, I get to post it.
IMG_9649Actor Kaitee Treadway is on a mission. Clad in full colonial-era garb and armed with her puppet, Samuel, she sits in a corner of the pier off the Boston Tea Party Museum. When she spots her mark – a young child looking lost – she makes her move. “Hello!” She calls out in a sing-song voice. “What’s your name?”  If the child answers, they’re asked, “have you heard about the events happening lately in Boston?” The script varies from there, but it always ends with the child and puppet brainstorming how best to protest British taxation.

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Pokemon Go and Business May Be A Perfect Match

As you may know if you follow my twitter, this summer I took a seven week intensive course at Harvard on Multimedia Journalism. My final project was to film and produce a three minute news story on any topic, and so I covered businesses using Pokemon Go as an advertising opportunity. You can view it here:

A big thank you to all the Pokemon Go players who agreed to be interviewed, especially those who showed up for the first Boston PokeWalk, Kerrin Connolly for organizing said PokeWalk, as well as One Condoms and Zipcar, both of whom were lovely and accommodating of my tight time schedule.

Revolution: A Primer

Hello friends, great first day at the Democratic National Convention, right? There sure was a lot of talk about revolutions there, which is why I think it’s a good time to sit down and have an honest chat about the historical record on revolutions, and how they actually work.

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More Than A Feeling, or: Thoughts Before the Stanley Cup (Originally for Pensburgh)

The first time I went to a Pittsburgh Penguins game in person it was March 15, 2015, an afternoon game against the Red Wings. It was the second of back-to-back afternoon games, and Evgeni Malkin had been injured the game before against the Bruins. The whole team was injured and trying to battle through it – that game, Patric Hornqvist would crack his ribs but play through them to the end of the season.

I hardly remember the game, honestly. I was in such a haze of overwhelmed excitement that unless I had pictures, I’d think going to it was all some weirdly vivid dream I had. One of the pictures I took was of this guy:

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